Archive for the ‘Article’ Category

Auditing Management Systems Standard Updated

Monday, July 16th, 2018

Management system standards are growing in popularity as organizations see how they can be applied to manage interrelated processes to achieve their objectives. From quality or energy management to food or traffic safety, the list of standards aimed at helping organizations put in place effective management systems is getting long.  In order to get the best out of a management system and ensure continuous improvement, regular auditing needs to take place.

 

ISO 19011:2018, Guidelines for Auditing Management Systems offers a uniform, harmonized approach, enabling effective auditing across multiple systems at the same time.  Key changes in the 2018 version include the addition of a risk-based approach to the principles of auditing to reflect the enhanced focus on risk in both management standards and the business application.  In addition, guidance has been expanded in a number of areas such as managing an audit program, and conducting an audit.  We highly recommend purchasing this document. You can purchase ISO 19011:2018, Guidelines for Auditing Management Systems from the Techstreet Store .

 

New AIAG Regulatory Updates Page

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2018

In partnership with Compliance & Risks, AIAG now offers a New Free Regulatory Updates webpage that automatically populates with relevant content as regulations are updated and customer requirements change.

This RSS feed driven page is geared toward individuals involved with corporate responsibility and sustainability (CR/S), and those performing quality functions that require reporting into IMDS, and all others dealing with global substances of concern and waste regulation. The page’s simple and straightforward format allows users to quickly skim through content if desired, but also makes it easy to find more information. Clicking on any particular update’s title takes the user to the source page, where more detail is available.

Resources like this help support proactive and reactive measures within automotive industry organizations in response to changes in global regulations. Since the page populates with fresh content as regulations are updated and customer requirements change, the process of staying informed is made stress-free – checking back often will help individuals stay up to date on the latest need-to-know regulations and requirements, and better prepared for compliance challenges. Additionally, although new content appearing at the top of the page will displace older updates, the latter will still be readily available simply by scrolling down.

To view the Regulatory Updates page, simply visit this link, or navigate to the Corporate Responsibility tab at www.aiag.org to explore related topics.

Avoiding Supply Chain Counterfeit Components

Saturday, April 14th, 2018

The global trade in counterfeit electronics and equipment currently stands at $121 billion, but counterfeit products don’t just cost companies money, they ruin reputations, they’re dangerous and what’s worse, they can become harder to identify.  In March 2018, the Anti-Counterfeiting Forum, held at BAE System headquarters brought together a range of speakers who explained the steps that should be taken to prevent and combat counterfeit products.   A key topic proved to be the importance of ‘knowing your supply chain’.

A key speaker stated the U.S. Department of Defense has identified upwards of a million counterfeit components in its military supply chain, caused by poor supplier control and weak buying practices.  When sourcing parts, tell the subcontractors the full manufacturer’s part number and the current name, and if relevant, any previous names. He also said to avoid only identifying a component by using a distributor’s part number.  The problem of counterfeiting isn’t new, so existing stock should also be checked. Visual inspection alone is not sufficient, so the best course of action is to send suspicious products to a testing company.  He went on to explain that obsolete products are one of the main opportunities for counterfeiters. To combat this, he suggested better anticipating the demand for products and stocking up on them.

 

ISO 45001:2018 Published Today!

Monday, March 12th, 2018

ISO 45001 is an ISO standard for management systems of occupational safety and health. It follows the management system standard structure guideline Annex SL. The standard requirements aim to allow an organization to provide a safe and healthy workplace(s), by preventing work-related injury and/or ill health, as well as by proactively improving its OH&S performance.

ISO 45001:2018 is applicable to any organization that wishes to establish, implement and maintain an OH&S management system to improve occupational health and safety, eliminate hazards and minimize OH&S risks (including system deficiencies), take advantage of OH&S opportunities, and address OH&S management system nonconformances associated with its activities.

ISO 45001:2018 helps an organization to achieve the intended outcomes of its OH&S management system. Consistent with the organization’s OH&S policy, the intended outcomes of an OH&S management system include:

a) continual improvement of OH&S performance;

b) fulfillment of legal requirements and other requirements;

c) achievement of OH&S objectives.

To purchase ISO 45001:2018 OH&S Management System visit the ANSI Standards Store.

ISO 9001 and 14001 Certification Audits

Saturday, January 13th, 2018

A notice from the International Accreditation Forum (IAF) that an official resolution has been reached regarding audits performed to ISO 9001:2008 and ISO 14001:2004.

A key aspect of this resolution was the following mandate:

“Effective March 15, 2018, all audits performed to ISO 9001 or ISO 14001 must be performed to the 2015 year revision.”

As the three-year transition for ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 moves into its final year, IAF (the global association for developing the principles and practices for the conduct of conformity assessment) has passed a resolution that as of 15 March 2018, conformity assessment bodies must conduct all ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 initial, surveillance and recertification audits to the new versions – ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 14001:2015.

Any organizations who need to move to the new version of ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 should contact their conformity assessment body as soon as possible to make arrangements for their audit.  Note that failure to achieve certification to the 2015 standard by the deadline means that your certification is no longer valid and this may affect your ability to supply to all markets.   A copy of this resolution can be obtained from the IAF Here.

ISO Management System Standards Certifications Continue to Rise

Sunday, November 5th, 2017

Use of ISO management system standards continues to rise.  The number of valid certificates to ISO management system standards (MSS) rose 8 % in 2016 compared to 2015, according to latest figures of the ISO Survey.  The ISO Survey is an annual survey of valid certifications to ISO management system standards issued by accredited certification bodies worldwide. It is the most comprehensive overview of certifications to these standards currently available.

The ever-popular ISO 9001, Quality management systems – Requirements, and ISO 14001, Environmental management systems – Requirements with guidance for use, were up 7 % and 8 % respectively, with 1,106,356 and 346,189 certificates issued, while more recent additions to the survey, such as ISO 50001 for energy management and ISO/IEC 27001 for information security, rose by 69 % and 21 % respectively, amassing 20,216 and 33,290 certificates worldwide.

As ISO does not perform certification, the figures in the ISO Survey represent the number of valid certificates reported to ISO by accredited certification bodies as at 31 December 2016.  View the executive summary and full results on the ISO Survey page.

ISO/IEC 17025 moves to final stage of revision

Tuesday, September 19th, 2017

Calibration as well as testing and analyzing a sample is the daily practice of more than 60,000 laboratories worldwide, but how can they reassure customers about the reliability of their results?  Over the years, ISO/IEC 17025, General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories, has become the international reference for testing and calibration laboratories wanting to demonstrate their capacity to deliver trusted results.

However, the laboratory environment has changed dramatically since ISO/IEC 17025 was last published in year 2005.  After 15 years with all the significant changes and market conditions worldwide, it is time for a revised standard. Developed jointly by ISO and IEC in the Committee on conformity assessment (CASCO), the new version of ISO/IEC 17025 will replace the 2005 version and is scheduled for publication at the end of 2017.

For more information on the main changes to the standard, see the article on the ISO Website.

ISO 19011:2018 – Expected Changes

Friday, August 18th, 2017

After the recent meeting of the international committee ISO/PC 302 JWG1, the revised ISO 19011—Guidelines for auditing management systems has become much clearer. Here’s an example of a change:

Risk-based approach:

This has been the most significant addition to ISO 19011 so far.  The High Level Structure requires that planning be done based on the organization’s risks and opportunities (section 6.1), which in turn should be derived from the organizational context and its internal and external issues (sections 4.1 and 4.2). The current ISO 19011:2011 includes risk considerations only in relation to the actual audit program and individual audits, that is the risks of not achieving the audit objectives and the risks to the auditee as a result of the audit activities.  A significant new addition to the text of ISO 19011, starting with the inclusion and definition of a new auditing principle:

“Risk-based approach is an audit approach that considers risks and opportunities. The risk-based approach should substantively influence the planning, conducting, and reporting of audits in order to ensure that audits are focused on matters that are significant for the auditee and for achieving the audit program objectives.”  

This addition in Section 5—Managing the audit program, suggests that consideration be given to the organization’s identified risks and opportunities and the actions taken to address them when preparing the audit program. While the High Level Structure requires internal audits “be conducted at planned intervals,” the new ISO 19011 suggests that audit priority should be given to allocating resources and methods to matters in a management system with higher inherent risk and lower performance.  STAY TUNED…

Configuration Management-2017

Thursday, July 6th, 2017

ISO 10007:2017, “Quality management – Guidelines for configuration management“, provides guidance on the use of configuration management within an organization. It is applicable to the support of products and services from concept to disposal.  The purpose of this third edition of ISO 10007 is to enhance understanding of the subject, promote the use of configuration management, and assist organizations applying configuration management to improve their performance.

If your familiar with the previous version of ISO 10007 Configuration Management, the language, for example, configuration status accounting has been removed, and thank goodness this version is much more clearer for the user and applicable interpretation to your business configuration needs.  Configuration management is a management activity that applies technical and administrative direction over the life cycle of a product and service, its configuration identification and status, and related product and service configuration information. Configuration management documents the product or service configuration. It provides identification and traceability, the status of achievement of its physical and functional requirements, and access to accurate information in all phases of the life cycle.

Configuration management can be used to meet the product and service identification and traceability requirements specified in ISO 9001:2015, 8.5.2.  Purchase  the ISO 10007:2017 Standard here.

Feedback Sought for ISO Standards Survey

Monday, June 12th, 2017

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) is seeking stakeholder feedback to gather information for the future International Organization for Standardization (ISO) survey, focused on service standards and management system standards.

The responses will be considered for a survey that highlights ISO’s strategy for service standardization, which was adopted in February 2016 to accomplish multifaceted results:

  • Increase ISO’s visibility as a developer of International Standards for services;
  • Support ISO members during challenges associated with the development of standards for services;
  • Gain a better understanding of market interests and trends in the services sector.

You can fill out the ANSI survey via This Link by the deadline of Friday, June 30, 2017.